• Cancer Prevention Lifestyle



    Are you aware that less than 10 % of all cancer cases are thought to be related to genetic risk factors. The remainder—90 %—appear to be triggered by lifestyle and environmental factors. Taking control of your Lifestyle can significantly reduce your odds of getting cancer and is way more powerful than simply trying to detect it. This means reducing your toxic intake as much as possible. I certainly don’t want to be living in a bubble, however, there are many things I can do to improve my odds. Today I am going to share with you a few of the cancer prevention things I am doing.

    Does this guarantee I’ll never get cancer? No, I do have a strong family history of it. But if I do get it, my body will be better equipped to fight it off!

    My Cancer Prevention Lifestyle

    tummy-painHaving a cancer prevention lifestyle means seeking out organically-produced items or creating my own. I am talking about food, clothing, cleaning products, personal care products, etc. Because it’s the accumulated exposure from all these varied sources that end up wreaking havoc, it all matters.

    Some steps you can take to lower your risk:

    • Don’t smoke – I thought I’d start with this one because we have been inindated with it, so just don’t!grapes-500x500
    • Limit alcohol – Your cancer risk increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly. So, limit yourself to less than 1 drink per day as even small amounts increase risk according to research studies. (You can get the polyphenols and resveratrols from dark skinned grape juice without the negatives.)
    • Maintain a healthy weight – There are lots of suggestions on this blog. If you don’t know where to begin, check out my Back to Basics – Steps for a Healthy Body 
    • Be physically active – This can help you maintain a healthy weight, which, in turn, helps prevent cancer.  According to the Department of Health and Human Services, a healthy adult should engage in at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity (like a brisk walk) or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity weekly, plus strength training at least twice a week. Get some ideas 
    • healthy bodyEat healthy – That means lots of fresh (or frozen) fruits, veggies and beans, healthy fats (nuts, seeds, virgin olive oil, virgin organic coconut oil, etc), lean animal products, etc. AND keeping all types of processed food to a bare minimum. Anything high in calories and low in nutrition should be reserved for extra special occasions only.
    • Read ingredient labels – It is mind boggling how many artificial and toxic honestly-labeled-foodsingredients are in not only our foods, but household and personal care products too. I go for the natural or make it myself. (again lots on this blog) Just because it says ‘Natural” on the front of the bottle doesn’t mean it is – READ!
    • Reduce hazard chemical contact – An example: ‘Flame-retardant’ materials which were created and required for our safety but have now proven to be more of a hazard than helpful (removed from children’s pajamas in the 70’s). Get list of offenders HERE
    • Get your vitamin D & then cover-up – There is some research showing that vitamin D may help in prevention. As a very general guide, you need to expose about 40 % of your 0701161623aentire body to the sun for approximately 20 minutes when the sun is at its zenith. If you plan to be in the sun longer then use a sunscreen. Some ingredients in the sunscreen may be cancerous. I know a vicious circle so, I make my own. Get the recipe 
    • Avoid electromagnetic fields – As much as possible, limit your exposure and protect yourself from radiation produced by cell phones, as well as from radiation-based medical scans, including dental x-rays, CT scans, and mammograms. In other words, reduce your exposure by having such tests only when absolutely necessary.
    • Get enough restorative sleep – Poor sleep can interfere with your melatonin production, which is associated with an increased risk of insulin resistance and weight gain, both of which can contribute to cancer. Contact me (Kathy@kathyskinner.com) for some essential oil combinations that work wonders to enhance your sleep.
    • Learn stress management tools – Stress from all causes is a major contributor to disease. Even the Center for Disease Control states that 85 % of disease is driven by emotional factors. Long deep breathes usually help with the immediate stuff. Yoga, walking, meditation and essential oils can help with immediate and overall. Out the Learn about the Benefits of Walking   spiritual
    • Stay Spiritually connected – There are many researchers who believe that certain beliefs, attitudes, and practices associated with being a spiritual person influence health in a positive way. I personally stay spiritually connected through prayer, meditation, Bible study, worship and regularly meeting with members of my faith based community.

    I don’t know if I will get cancer or how long I will live but I can tell you that I am very healthy and have lots of energy to do the things I want. I feel very blessed and wish the same for you!



    Sources and References:

    Caring.com; Melanie Haiken; cancer.gov; MayoClinic.org; HealthUCSD.edu; ajcn.org; aromaticscience.com; Healthwithfood.org

    October 9, 2016 • Essential Oils, Healthy Hints • Views: 31

  • Zucchini Carrot Oatmeal Cookies


    When I have a surplus of zucchini in my garden, I will make the usual zucchini bread but I also make these oatmeal cookies. They always get raves and requests for the recipe so I figured it was about time I recorded it here!

    This last batch I used a 1/2 cup of ground old fashion oats in place of the wheat flour and they were great again!

    Zucchini Carrot Oatmeal Cookies

    Makes 2 ½ dozen cookies


    • 1 ½ cups old fashioned oats
    • ¾ cup white beans pureed
    • 1/2 c wheat flour
    • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp baking soda
    • 1/2 tsp sea salt
    • 1 tsp vanilla
    • 2/3 cup coconut oil liquified
    • 1 cup grated zucchinioatmeal-zucchini-carrot
    • 1/2 c shredded carrot
    • 1/2 c shredded coconut
    • 1/2 c Raisins
    • 2 eggs
    • ¼ cup local raw honey
    • 1/2 c brown sugar


    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
    2. Grate zucchini and squeeze out excess water. (I grate onto a paper towel and then use the paper towel to get rid of the excess water. Wrap the paper towel or dish cloth around the zucchini and squeeze over the sink.) Grate carrot 
    3. Beat oil, honey & sugar. Add in the eggs and vanilla and beat until well combined.
    4. Combine flour, cinnamon, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl.
    5. Gradually add flour mixture to the oil/sugar mixture and beat on low speed until well combined. Then gradually add in beans, beating until combined
    6. Stir in oats, zucchini, carrot, coconut, and raisins.
    7. Drop by rounded tablespoons about 2 inches apart onto lightly greased cookie sheets. Bake for 10-12 minutes until they just start to turn color. Let cool on sheets for a few minutes before moving to a cooling rack and ENJOY!

    Per Cookie:

    101 cal, 11g fat, 10mg sodium, 11g carbs, 1g fiber, 7g sugar, 1.5g protein


    Bread_Surplus VeggiesMore Zucchini recipes:

    October 3, 2016 • Recipes • Views: 31

  • Marinated Cucumbers, Onions, and Tomatoes

    cucumber, onion, tomato layers

    I absolutely love this recipe. It is so easy, it’s raw clean eating and useful in many ways. Once the marinated cucumbers, onions, and tomatoes are ready, they can be eaten on their own or used as toppers for salad greens (no extra dressing required), on rice, bugler, quinoa, couscous or cottage cheese.

    cherry tomatoesUsually I use Roma Tomatoes, regular cucumbers sliced along with rings of onion. As you will see in the photos, I used cherry tomatoes as I had an over-abundant harvest of them and I chopped my onions and my ‘pickling’ cucumbers since I had so many of them as well!

    Marinated Cucumbers, Onions, and Tomatoes


    • 3 medium cucumbers, peeled and sliced 1/4 inch thick
    • 1 medium onion, sliced and separated into rings
    • 3 medium tomatoes, cut into wedges
    • 1/2 cup aple cider vinegar with mother
    • 1/4 cup raw cane sugar
    • 1 cup water
    • 2 teaspoons salt
    • 1 teaspoon fresh coarse ground black pepper
    • 1/4 cup olive oil

    Directions:  marinated tomato, cucumbers

    • Combine ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.
    • Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving


    • I find it will keep in the frig about a week
    • You can also change it up by adding fresh herbs or a drop or two of essential oils (my favorite is 1 drop each Basil and Oregano)



    October 1, 2016 • Essential Oils, Recipes • Views: 39

  • Marinated Asian Eggplant


    If you have been following my blog, you are aware that I am diligently eating more raw. So it only made sense that I should look for a way to eat my eggplant in a raw form. This mean not cooking it over 118 degrees. I decided to try marinating it to eat as an appetizer or use in my salads. This is what I came up with. I love it both ways. It is a bit rich so it keeps me from over eating! I served it at one of my Healthy Habits classes and it got rave reviews even from people who don’t like eggplant. I have to give them lots of kudos for even trying!!!

    Marinated Asian Eggplant

    Makes about 5 -7 servings (28 Bites)


    • 3/4 lbs Japanese/Asian eggplant (Black Beauty globe eggplant works well too)
    • Pinch of salt
    • 1 tbsp. sesame oil
    • 1 drop ginger essential oil or 1 tsp. grated ginger
    • 1 tbsp. Rice vinegar
    • 1 1/2 tbsp. Liquid Aminos or soy sauce
    • 2 drops liquid Stevia or 1 tsp. sugar
    • 1 tsp. White wine or Vermouth
    • ½ Tbsp. Sesame Seeds


    • Wash and trim eggplant ends.
    • Steam eggplants for 10 minutes or until barely soft.
    • Cut into bite size strips.
    • Sprinkle pinch of salt.
    • Combine remaining ingredients in a bowl.
    • Mix well (until sugar is dissolved).
    • Chill and marinate eggplants for overnight.

    1 Bite =13.5 calories, .5g Fat, 16mg Sodium, 2g Carbs, .6g Fiber, .8g Sugar, .3g Protein


    September 13, 2016 • Essential Oils, Recipes • Views: 90

  • Zucchini Stuffed with Turkey Sausage


    I love growing Zucchini because it is so easy to grow. If you have ever tried it, you probably also found that once it gets going it can get out of hand. You may have even found yourself with a few giant sized zucchinis. The green ones tend to loose some of their flavor but are still good for breads, cookies and cakes. This year I tried the Yellow Zucchini and found they retain their flavor even when large which makes them a better choice for stuffing! After a recent harvest I found myself with a 16 inch yellow zucchini so I decided to try it with my Turkey Sausage stuffing mixture. It was fabulous!!!

    Zucchini Stuffed with Turkey Sausage

    Makes about 6 Servings


    • 1 large zucchini (about 12 inches, yellow zucchini tastes better)
    • 1 lb. Turkey Sausage
    • ½ c chopped onion
    • ½ T minced garlic
    • ½ c chopped celery
    • ¼ c chopped bell pepper
    • ½ c fresh pureed tomatoes
    • 1 egg
    • 1 c cooked brown rice
    • 1 tsp sea salt
    • 2/3 c Fresh grated Parmesan Cheese


    • Preheat oven to 350 degrees
    • Cut zucchini in half lengthwise
    • Clean out seeds and puncture pulp with a fork several times
    • Combine remaining ingredients except cheese
    • Fill each half with mixture, mounding towards edges
    • Place zucchini in a large pan with about one inch of water in bottom of pan 063
    • Bake about 45 minutes until tender
    • Sprinkle with cheese
    • 068Broil for about 5 minutes until cheese melts and turns golden
    • Remove and let cool a few minutes.
    • Slice and serve


    It is always nice having leftovers so I can have something quick for those days I’m just too busy to prepare a healthy meal. I sliced up the remained and put some in the refrigerator and some in the freezer. We warmed up and ate the refrigerator pieces about five days later and it tasted just as good as the day I made them. We haven’t had the freezer pieces as yet so I’ll have to get back to you. I am curious to see how well they hold their shape as well as texture and taste.

    September 12, 2016 • Recipes • Views: 54

  • Summer Activities to Burn 100 Calories


    We have all heard about how we need to spend time being active on an almost daily basis. There are many ways to burn 100 calories, but if you are like me, being inside in a gym is just not where I want to be on these beautiful summer days. So for FUN, I have listed some FUN activities and how long it takes to burn just 100 calories!

    (based on a 150 pound person)

    Bicycling (5 mph) – 35 minutes
    Canoeing (2.5 mph) – 35 minutes
    Golf (2-some, carrying clubs) – 19 minutes
    Horse back Riding (sit to trot) – 24 minutes
    Jogging (10 minute mile , 6 mph) – 9 minutes
    childJumping Rope (70 jumps per minute ) – 9 minutes
    Swimming (crawl, 20 yard per minute ) – 20 minutes
    Tennis (recreational singles) – 13 minutes
    Volleyball (recreational) – 23 minutes
    Walking (2 mph) – 30 minutes


    • Boosts your mood
    • Gives you more energy
    • Helps you sleep better
    • Reduces the risk of developing coronary heart disease (CHD) and the risk of dying from CHD
    • Reduces stress
    • Lowers the risk of developing high blood pressure
    • Lowers the risk of developing non-insulindependent (type 2) diabetes
    • Reduces the risk of developing colon cancer
    • Helps people achieve and maintain a healthy body weight
    • Helps build and maintain healthy bones, muscles, and joints

    Just a few reminders:

    • If you haven’t been active, start out slow and shorter amounts of time.
    • Choose some thing you like to do!
    • Wear comfortable clothes & shoes
    • Stay hydrated – Herbalife’s HYDRATE is a healthy alternative to heavy sugar & sugar substitutes. Get some HERE!
    • Wear sunscreen if you are out for more than15 minutes.  Get my 0701161623aHomemade recipe HERE
    • Use an insect repellent, one without DEET I recommend one that  works great for me. Because of the FDA I can’t name it so contact me to Get Some! Kathy@kathyskinner.com 
    • Most importantly – Have FUN!!!

    July 23, 2016 • Healthy Hints • Views: 189

  • Natural Sunscreen – DIY


    I love the summertime and the opportunity to be outside a lot! Having spent most of my life in Southern California with over 25 years within 2 miles of the beach, my skin has absorbed a good amount of rays. Over the years I have tried a whole lot of sunscreen products. With my ever increasing desire to reduce the toxic load to my body, I have turned to natural ways to help protect myself from too many rays. This means I aim for my outdoor time to be early mornings and late afternoons and evenings. If you see me out and about I will be wearing a hat and sunglasses. And I use my Natural Sunscreen that I quickly and easily whip up at home for just a fraction of the cost of the store bought varieties.

    sunburnConventional sunscreens may help prevent sunburn, but they often contain ingredients that may do long term harm. Even the mainstream media has started to mention some these issues associated with Oxybenzone, retinyl palminate, and nanoparticles.

    Several oils can be helpful on the skin. Check out this study.  It lists the SPF of many common cooking and essential oils.

    The article said Virgin Coconut oil has an SPF of about 8 and sandalwood essential oil has an SPF of 30.  The quality of the essential oil will make a big difference in the SPF, so if you want to know which brand I use contact me at Kathy@kathyskinner.com



    My vintage non-electronic scale still works!

    What you need:

    • 40 drops sandalwood essential oil (Buy)
    • 4 ounces Virgin coconut oil (Buy)
    • a scale (Buy)
    • Glass Jar (Buy)


    • Weight out the Virgin Coconut oil on scale
    • 0701161619Combine oils and store in a glass jar.
    • Apply before exposure to sun.
    • Reapply as needed and after being in the water.

    For greater protection, increase the sandalwood to 80 drops.

    Here is another recipe for a single use:

    3 drops Sandalwood or Helichrysum for each teaspoon of Fractionated Coconut oil.

    July 2, 2016 • Essential Oils, Recipes • Views: 173

  • 4 Ways to Make Ice Tea

    iced tea glass

    I’m an avid tea drinker, both the hot and iced variety and being that June is National Ice Tea Month, I thought I would share a bit about it. Iced tea is consumed world-wide. Here in the United States, iced tea makes up about 85% of all tea consumed.

    Iced tea is a refreshing, cold drink which can be enjoyed all year round. It can be made using black, green, white or herbal tea. It is usually served with ice cubes, maybe some sliced fruit and sweetened or not. It can be freshly made a variety of ways for just pennies or purchased ready made.

    There are only 2 calories in 1 cup of unsweetened iced tea while sweetened tea can contain a whole lot more, so read the label!!!

    I Want My Iced Tea Now Methods:

    • Simple heat water in a pan to almost boiling. Then add 1- 3 tea bags of your choice and let it steep for 5 – 10 minutues. Place ice in a glass along with a metal spoon (this keeps the glass from breaking) and pour tea in. Drink as is or a add sweetener. I like to use a drop or two of liquid Stevia, no calories. SweetLeaf My favorite is SweetLeaf which comes plain or flavored. Get it HERE
    • I like to make my tea in a big batch using my Mr. Coffee Ice Tea Maker, get HERE. It is so easy and this way I can use tea bags or fresh ice teamint from my garden, I have Spearmint and also Chocolate Mint – Yummmm!  Following manufacturer directions is so simple. First I fill water in the pitcher to the water line and then pour it into the machine. Then fill ice up to the ice line on the pitcher. Next I add the teabags into the holding container or cram in as much mint as I can in it, put the lid on and put it ontop the pitcher and push the button.

    I Want My Tea Later Methods:

    • Sun-tea is very popular and easy as long as you are sun-tea-vertpatient. Find a large glass jar fill it with water and 4-5 tea bags. Put it out in the sun for several hours, that’s it! 
    • Refrigerator tea takes a bit longer. Do as above and put container in the refrigerator for about 10-12 hours.

    Flavoring Your Tea is as wide open as your imagination! One thing you may not have thought of is using certified pure therapeutic grade essential oils. (Not all essential oils or brands can be taken internally. Email me to learn what I use, Kathy@kathyskinner.com)

    When using essential oils, just use ONE drop, try it and then add ONE more if you want more flavor. Some, like Peppermint, are quite potent so just stick a toothpick into the essential oil container and then stir it around in your tea. Other essential oils to try are:

    • Basil
    • Ginger
    • Grapefruit
    • Jasmine
    • Lavender
    • Lemon
    • Lime
    • Wild Orange
    • Ylang Ylang

    Email me to get essential oils or learn more – Kathy@kathyskinner.com 

    Have any other ideas? Share your favorite Iced Tea so we can all enjoy!


    June 20, 2016 • Essential Oils, Recipes • Views: 189

  • Plant Protein

    plant protein

    I am often asked, “What is protein?” “Why do I need it?” “What are some good non-animal sources?” These are all very good questions and I always get excited when someone wants to know more about ‘Plant Protein’! There’s so much to cover I thought an outline of info would be most helpful.

    What Is Protein? What Does It Do For Me?

    • It is an important component of every cell in the body. It is an organic compound, composed of 22 amino acids, otherwise known as the building blocks of life.
    • It is stored in muscles and organs and the body utilizes it to build and repair tissues, as well as for the production of enzymes and hormones.  healthy body
    • Proteins make it possible for blood to carry oxygen throughout the body.
    • Along with fat and carbohydrates, protein is a “macronutrient,” meaning the body needs relatively large amounts of it.
    • Our daily recommended protein requirements should be about 35% of our total caloric intake for adults, with men needing slightly more than women.
    • Calculate your amount HERE 
    • A lack of protein can cause loss of muscle mass, decreased immunity, as well as weakening of the heart and respiratory system.

    All Protein Not Alike 

    Different kinds of meat, eggs and two bottles of milk --- Image by © Imagemore Co., Ltd./Corbis

    • Animal sources of protein tend to be complete. They contain all the amino acids needed to build new proteins.
    • Incomplete proteins – lack or are low in one or more amino acids that the body can’t make from scratch or create by modifying another amino acid. These usually come from fruits, vegetables, grains, and nuts. People who don’t eat meat, fish, poultry, eggs, or dairy products should eat a variety of protein-containing foods each day.
    • If you’re eating a good mix of fruits, veggies, grains and legumes, then your body simply collects what it needs from the “amino soup” that your digestion system has absorbed. There are a growing number of vegan bodybuilders, ultra marathon runners and award-winning athletes out there to prove that meeting your protein needs on a plant-based diet is simple and successful.

    Can you get too much animal protein?

    • All animal products are devoid of fiber.
    • Digesting animal proteins releases acids that the body usually neutralizes with calcium and other buffering agents in the blood as well as decreasing oxygen levels in the blood, and negatively impacting the digestive/lymphatic system.
    • Eating lots of animal protein, such as the amounts recommended in the so-called low-Carb or no-Carb diets, takes lots of calcium. Some of this may be pulled from bone. Following a high-animal protein diet for a few weeks probably won’t have much effect on bone strength. Doing it for a long time, though, could weaken bones.


    All plant-based foods are practically free from cholesterol, tend to be high in fiber, and are often alkalizing to the body. Some plant proteins contain all the amino acids needed to build new proteins. Some of more common ones are:  chia-seeds

    • Quinoa – 1 cup cooked is 8.1 grams
    • Buckwheat – 1 cup cooked is 5.7 grams
    • Soy – ½ cup cooked edamame is 11.1 grams
    • Chia seed – 1 ounce (2.75 Tbsp) is 4 grams
    • Hemp seed -1 Tbsp hulled is 3.3 grams

    PLANT Protein Combining to Make High-Quality Protein

    • Legumes provide an essential amino acid called lysine, which is low in many grains.
      • Legumes are particularly high in soluble fiber, which can help lower cholesterol and glucose levels. One cup Lentils gives 17.9 grams protein. One cup Beans (Black, Kidney, Mung, Pinto) gives 12-15 grams protein.
    • Whole grains provide methionine and cysteine, which are low in legumes, beans, peas, lentils and peanuts.
      • Organic Whole GrainsBrown rice is higher in protein, fiber and other nutrients than polished white rice. One cup cooked long grain brown rice has 5 grams of protein.
      • Wikipedia reports, Oat protein is nearly equivalent in quality to soy protein, which World Health Organization research has shown is equal to meat, milk, and egg protein. One cooked cup of Oats has 6.08 grams of protein
      • Whole grains are higher in protein and nutrients than refined grains, such as white bread and pasta
    • Grains are commonly used to complement the protein in legumes/beans.
    • It is not necessary to combine complementary proteins at the same meal. Just be sure to eat a variety of proteins sources throughout the day.
    • Mix two or more of the items on each line below together to make a complete protein.
      • Legumes with Grains like brown rice or whole grain bread
      • Legumes with Nuts
      • Legumes with Seeds
      • Vegetables with grains
    • All vegetables contain protein. Here are a few that have higher amounts:
      • cauliflower-high-protein-plant-food8 spears of asparagus – 3.08 grams of protein
      • One cup cooked cauliflower – 2.28 grams of protein
      • One cup cooked spinach – 5.35 grams of protein
      • One cup cooked chopped broccoli – 5.7 grams of protein

    So as you can see there are lots of ways to get your plant protein. One of my favorite ways is so simple to make, Curried Lentil Salad.lentil salad I make a batch to keep a bowl of it in the frig so there is always some healthy plant protein ready-to-eat!



    May 21, 2016 • Healthy Hints • Views: 490

  • Easy Homemade Sauerkraut


    This is so easy, economical, and way healthy than your store shelf variety because it is NOT processed or cooked. It’s just fermented so full of vitamins, minerals, enzymes and probiotics!

    Homemade Sauerkraut

    Makes 1 to 1 1/2 quarts


    • 1 medium head green cabbage washed
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons sea salt
    • 1 tablespoons caraway seeds (optional, for flavor)
    • 2 quart wide-mouth canning jar or equivalent 
    • Smaller jar that fits inside the larger canning jar
    • Clean stones, marbles, or other weights for weighing the smaller jar


    • Slice the cabbage: Discard the wilted, limp outer leaves of the cabbage but keep one good leaf.
    • Use food processor or Spiralizer  to cut into thin ribbons.  SpiralizerOR cut the cabbage into quarters and trim out the core. Slice each quarter down its length, making 8 wedges. Slice each wedge crosswise into very thin ribbons.
    • cabbage in bowlPlace the cabbage to a big mixing bowl and sprinkle the salt over top. Begin working the salt into the cabbage by massaging and squeezing the cabbage with your hands. At first, it may not watery cabbage
      seem like enough salt, but gradually, the cabbage will become watery and limp — more like coleslaw than raw cabbage. It will take 5 – 10 minutes. If you’d like to flavor your sauerkraut with caraway seeds, mix them in now.
    • Pack the cabbage into the jar. Periodically, press down the cabbage in the jar with your fist. Pour
      any liquid released by the cabbage while you were massaging it in the bowl into the jar.
    • Fold up the larger outer leave you saved and place it over the surface of the sliced cabbage. This will help keep the cabbage submerged in its liquid. jar in jar
    • Place the smaller jar into the mouth of the jar on top of the folded leaf. If needed weigh it down with clean stones or marbles. This will help keep the cabbage submerged beneath its liquid.
    • Cover the mouth of the mason jar with the screw on lid.
    • Over the next 24 hours, press down on the cabbage every once in a while with the smaller jar. As the cabbage releases its liquid, it will become more limp and compact and the liquid will rise over the top of the cabbage.
    • If after 24 hours, the liquid has not risen above the cabbage, dissolve 1 teaspoon of
      salt in 1 cup of water and add enough to submerge the cabbage.
    • Ferment the cabbage for 3 to 10 days. As it’s fermenting, keep the sauerkraut away from direct sunlight and at a cool room temperature — ideally 65°F to 75°F. Check it daily and press it down if the cabbage is floating above the liquid.
    • Smaller batches of sauerkraut will ferment more quickly than larger batches. Start tasting it after 3
      days — when the sauerkraut tastes good to you, remove the weight, screw on the cap, and refrigerate.
    • You can allow the sauerkraut to continue fermenting for 10 days or even longer. There’s no rule for when the sauerkraut is “done” — go by how it tastes to you.
    • While it’s fermenting, you may see bubbles coming through the cabbage, foam on the top, or white scum. These are all signs of a healthy, happy fermentation process. The scum can be skimmed off the top either during fermentation or before refrigerating. If you see any mold, skim it off immediately and make sure your cabbage is fully submerged.
    • This sauerkraut is a fermented product so it will keep for at 180least two months and often longer as long as it is kept refrigerated.


      We eat our sauerkraut as a side veggie and in sandwiches, wraps, hamburgers, hot dogs of course or just for a snack!

      How do you like yours?



    May 12, 2016 • Recipes • Views: 338